web analytics
Health, Ethics, and Genetics:
My dogs make it through the 4th of July with the selective use of Melatonin and a ThunderShirt. I suggest you use them too if you have noise phobic dogs. […]

Melatonin + ThunderShirt = Better 4th for Your Fearful Dog

My dogs make it through the 4th of July with the selective use of Melatonin and a ThunderShirt. I suggest you use them too if you have noise phobic dogs. […]

Life With Dogs, whose business model is exploiting animal suffering by aggregating and plagiarizing dog stories that are emotionally manipulative, has come out harshly against dog breeders over a bogus […]

Life With Dogs Attacks Dog Breeders

Life With Dogs, whose business model is exploiting animal suffering by aggregating and plagiarizing dog stories that are emotionally manipulative, has come out harshly against dog breeders over a bogus […]

If you missed RealSports with Bryant Gumble’s report on the ethics of breeding AKC dogs last night on HBO, fear not! Border-Wars worked with the producers over the last several […]

Watch RealSports “Unnatural Selection” on AKC Dogs

If you missed RealSports with Bryant Gumble’s report on the ethics of breeding AKC dogs last night on HBO, fear not! Border-Wars worked with the producers over the last several […]

Be sure to catch HBO’S Real Sports with Bryant Gumble tonight as they are doing a segment on the health and ethics of pedigree dog breeding for which Border-Wars was […]

HBO Asks if Dog Breeding is a “Real Sport”

Be sure to catch HBO’S Real Sports with Bryant Gumble tonight as they are doing a segment on the health and ethics of pedigree dog breeding for which Border-Wars was […]

Dog breeds are not separate species. Still, the majority of the dog fancy behaves and enforces breeding rules as if they were. Having what could be the most extant genetic […]

Minimum Viable Population: 5,000 Adults

Dog breeds are not separate species. Still, the majority of the dog fancy behaves and enforces breeding rules as if they were. Having what could be the most extant genetic […]

What do you get when you cross a Dodge Ram and a Pontiac GTO?  Either a Cheviot Caprice or a Jeep, apparently. On a farm in County Kildare Ireland, a […]

Introducing the 2014 Chevy Caprice Hybrid

What do you get when you cross a Dodge Ram and a Pontiac GTO?  Either a Cheviot Caprice or a Jeep, apparently. On a farm in County Kildare Ireland, a […]

Latest Dispatches:
20

Why Border Collies? Transcript and Gallery

The following is an image gallery and transcript of Episode 001 of the WarHorn which you can listen to with the embedded player on this post: The WarHorn Podcast: Why Border Collies?

GALLERY:

TRANSCRIPT:

Greetings, I’m Christopher Landauer, the author behind Border-Wars and in this inaugural edition of the War Horn, a new podcast to accompany the articles published on border-wars.com,  I’d like to answer the question: “Why Border Collies?” to give you insight in to how I got in to the breed and why I’m so passionate about them.

In up coming editions of the War Horn I will flesh out my personal dog breeding philosophy, discuss the most pressing issues in dog ownership, and introduce you to scientific tools that will help further your own interest, understanding, and investigation into dogs and dog culture.

So, why Border Collies?

Border Collies are in my blood, they are part of my birthright. A history of exceptional dogs with names like Bongo, Oreo, Sassy, Black Jack, and Bonnie Belle; a pedigree which stretches back over five decades to the early 60s when my father earned the nick-name “Pavlov” from his siblings for putting over 70 tricks on the family border collie whom his sister couldn’t even house break.  The Landauers, who had always been dog people, were henceforth Border Collie people.

A deep love of dogs is a legacy from my mother’s family as well.  My grandma Margie got me my first dog, Rags.  She rescued the abandoned and near feral dog of indeterminate breed with a coat that appeared a mix of black and brown off of the streets of Chicago, washed and trimmed off years worth of road grime revealing a pearly white dog underneath all that neglect, and drove 900 miles to deliver him to me in Denver.  I was still in diapers and just learning to walk, but to me Rags was as big as a horse.  He couldn’t have weighed 20 pounds but I was convinced I could ride him like a Knight bestrides a Percheron.

In the decades since then, I have lived a life measured in dog years and taken to heart the lessons, joy, and sorrow of befriending animals that live their lives so much faster than we do.  Over the decades we have bought, rescued, rehomed, bred and buried Border Collies; both with papers and without, from before the AKC recognized them, before the ABCA even existed, and before the movie Babe brought them international attention.  As a toddler I was lulled to sleep by my father’s stories of his border collie adventures that transpired long before the two most notable modern Border Collie authors left the big city, bought farms, found Border Collies and filled bookshelves with stories of their dogs.

My roots in this breed run deep and I value them not for romantic notions that they are living fossils of a pastoral lifestyle that can be pantomimed through historical re-enactment on hobby farms.  Nor do I value them as surrogate ego champions to compete for me in beauty pageants or contests of athletic skill.  I value them for the depths of their souls and the profoundly rewarding relationship a man can forge with his Border Collie.  Not as a tool to support the bottom line, not as labor saving device, not as an object of conspicuous consumption or vehicle for social climbing, and certainly not as a means to accrue virtues that I am unable or unwilling to cultivate within myself.

I don’t place any derivative value above the dogs themselves.  They are not a means to an end, they are the end.

And this is why my voice is rather unconventional in the Border Collie world.  My interest in and understanding of the breed far predates the work versus show debate that so deeply characterizes the current political landscape.  You’ll notice that many enthusiasts in both of those groups place their hobby above the dogs.  The work, show, or trial success is the end and the dogs are a means to that end.  This is why you’ll see many trialists and pageant breeders trading dogs like sports teams trade players, breeding and starting many more dogs than will ever end up at a trial or in a ring.  And regularly changing their roster of dogs.

“Sorry, Spot, it’s just business. I’m gunna have to let you go. No hard feelings, alright? But, uh, clean out your kennel by 11, the new guy will be here after lunch.”

This attitude places work and show breeders in the odd position of trying to sell their excess dogs and puppies to a public based upon the sales pitch of “well, these aren’t really what I want, but they’ll be great for you!”

I don’t have this conflict of interest.  I value my dogs for the same reasons I want my puppy buyers to value them: because they’re charming, curious, clever, chipper, and will live long enriching lives, hopefully with just one family.  Our interests are aligned and there’s nothing that I would sacrifice in pursuit of some other goal that would leave a puppy buyer with a problematic dog.

This isn’t the case with many work and show breeders.  I see them sacrifice health, longevity and temperament because those things are not rewarded in the ring or on the field, there’s no value in a retired or unsuccessful working or show dog and without sentimental attachments, these dogs get sold on or put down.  When you have a stable full of prospects you can afford to roll the dice on their hips and if one comes up dysplastic, it’s unfortunate but $8 thousand dollars is better spent training up a dozen more dogs versus patching up the one who is crippled at 2 years old.

“That’ll do, Moss. Sorry about your hips, but there’s no pain where you’re going.”

People like me don’t buy a stable full of prospect best-friends and then rehome the ones that don’t work out after a few months.  Instead, I spent years tracking down just the right breeders and just the right dogs, meeting the dogs these breeders had produced before, being highly selective in the sort of puppy I wanted.  Because it wasn’t just  a puppy I wanted, it was a rock solid, sweet as pie dog that would stack the genetic deck in favor of producing future generations of family dogs, Landauer Dogs, that were a joy to live with and low maintenance.

I have zero interest in being best buds with a dog who is a jerk or a liability and I don’t want just five to seven years of companionship, I want twice that.

I only breed and stud my dogs out occasionally, I home-raise the puppies, and  I don’t sacrifice health or personality to win ribbons, impress judges, or follow the herd. My dogs are family and my breeding stock was carefully chosen for uncompromising quality.  My primary goal is to produce Border Collies with rock solid temperaments, dogs that will be welcomed with you wherever you go and which will leave an indelible impression.  Dogs that will sleep in your bed and ride shotgun in your Jeep and which will have more friends than you on Facebook.  My foundation dogs, Dublin and Celeste, know no strangers and are amazingly people oriented.  Their offspring have proven to carry these traits as well and now Mercury has taken the reigns as my go to stud dog and his offspring are spectacular examples of the breed.

Over half the puppies bred and studded from my dogs are owned by professional dog handlers who earn a living with their canine companions.  They are at work today in dog training centers, on cattle and horse ranches, excelling in all manner of dog sports; doing therapy work in hospitals and hospice and providing trained assistance for the disabled; one is a retail store ambassador; another is a mascot for a dog walking service, and several hobby herd sheep and goats.  They have modeled in print and on film for The Bark Magazine, Kong, and others.  The most humbling trait, however, is that all of my puppy buyers are return border collie customers. They’ve owned the breed before, know how amazing and challenging the breed is and chose my dogs to parent their next Border Collie.  No matter how amazing these dogs are at their sport, work, therapy or modeling jobs, I know that their truly highest and best purpose is to be a well adjusted, interesting, and robust friend and pet.  They don’t give awards for that job, and few breeders think it’s even something to brag about let alone breed for, but it’s by far the most important quality to me.

I hope you’ve enjoyed learning about how I got into Border Collies and why I’m so passionate about the breed.

In up coming editions of the War Horn you will find more deep thoughts on dog breeding philosophy, strategies to tackle some of the big issues in dogdom, and explanations of scientific and biological tools that you can use to evaluate your own dogs, potential breeding stock, and the greater health of your favorite breeds.

In the next edition I’ll answer the question “Why Border-Wars?” and explain the reasoning behind the name and content of the articles I publish.

Thank you for listening to the inaugural edition of the WarHorn. Be sure to subscribe to the feed at border-wars.com for timely updates on new articles, like BorderWarsBlog on Facebook for more frequent musings and links of note, and if you’ve enjoyed what you’ve heard please share this podcast with your dog-savvy friends.

On behalf of Dublin, Celeste, Mercury and Gemma, this is Christopher Landauer… signing off.

* * *
Comments and disagreements are welcome, but be sure to read the Comment Policy. If this post made you think and you'd like to read more like it, consider a donation to my 4 Border Collies' Treat and Toy Fund. They'll be glad you did. You can subscribe to the feed or enter your e-mail in the field on the left to receive notice of new content. You can also like BorderWars on Facebook for more frequent musings and curiosities.
* * *

7

The WarHorn Podcast: Why Border Collies?

Border-Wars_WarHorn_iTunes_Cover_Image

Exciting news, Border-Wars fans: Today is the launch of the inaugural episode of The WarHorn, a dog culture podcast!

Like the blog, the podcast will tackle dog culture, breeding ethics, and health & genetics in companion animals. With a focus on Border Collies, canine registries, pedigree abuses, inbreeding, rescue and shelters, dog sports, conformation shows, sheep trials, coat color genetics, legislation and dog breed history and myths, the WarHorn is an audio companion to the articles on Border-Wars.

The first episode is called “Why Border Collies?” wherein I answer the question of how I got into the breed and why I’m so passionate about advocating for a twenty-first century update to the breeding methods, culture, and scientific understanding in Border Collies and all dogs.

You can listen the the first episode or download the mp3 here:



The podcast has its own feed located here: http://www.border-wars.com/feed/podcast

And soon, you’ll find The WarHorn available for download through iTunes.

Give it a listen, subscribe, and leave me some feedback.

* * *
Comments and disagreements are welcome, but be sure to read the Comment Policy. If this post made you think and you'd like to read more like it, consider a donation to my 4 Border Collies' Treat and Toy Fund. They'll be glad you did. You can subscribe to the feed or enter your e-mail in the field on the left to receive notice of new content. You can also like BorderWars on Facebook for more frequent musings and curiosities.
* * *

11

Melatonin + ThunderShirt = Better 4th for Your Fearful Dog

My dogs make it through the 4th of July with the selective use of Melatonin and a ThunderShirt. I suggest you use them too if you have noise phobic dogs.

Dublin gets a Frisbee workout in his ThunderShirt.

I’ve already discussed Melatonin before on the blog and I’ve documented my experience and dosing information later in this post, so I’d like to start off with the ThunderShirt.  It’s one of those things that sounds like woo-science and an expensive gimmick that probably won’t work and you’ll just be too afraid to take it back after it proves ineffective.  Being a skeptic and a general curmudgeon, it’d give me much pleasure to tell you all that the swaddling compression shirt is a big scam and not to waste your $40.  But I think it’s actually an effective tool, I’ve seen it work on my own dogs, and enough of my dog sport friends report very positive results with it that I feel no trepidation in recommending you give it a shot.

The basic theory (and again, getting hard science on this is going to be difficult making worries of woo all the stronger) is that compression helps with anxiety just like swaddling a child, the comforting fully body hug Temple Grandin speaks of as effective for some Autistic people, the radical hug therapies, compression garments worn by burn victims and athletes, and even massage therapy techniques.

Let me make it clear that unlike the bogus claims of some skeptics, the goal and proper use of the shirt is not to overly restrict your dog’s movement.  As you can see above in the photo and below in the video, Dublin does just fine running and catching a Frisbee in his ThunderShirt which I put on him in case the passing storm turned around or we caught the tail end of a strike while we were out at the park playing.

Some animals respond to the compression by not moving much at all and there’s a funny video of a cat that just shuts down and refuses to move when wearing a shirt that is obviously several sizes too small for his cat.  But I’ve seen this behavior in dogs with as little as adding booties to their feet to allow better traction for Frisbee demos on hardwood arena floors.  No one would suggest that little dog booties are overly restrictive on the dog’s movement, but the dog protested by not wanting to move at all.

..

 

The goal is not to strangle or incapacitate your dog, it’s a compression vest not a straight jacket and if sized correctly it does not bind the limbs or joints at all.  In fact if there is a possibility to do harm with the jacket, it’s most certainly in using one that is the wrong size and applied too tightly which could pinch off blood supply or nerves to the extremities, much like wrapping vet-wrap too tightly on a dog’s limbs.  Don’t do that, you don’t want to harm your dog while trying to help it.

What I notice when using the ThunderShirt is that the dogs are initially reticent to move about excessively and yet they are not in pain or desirous to remove the garment. They’re fully able to try to remove it themselves if they don’t like it, and yet I’ve never had them try.  Nor will they destroy it when it’s left about (which is what they do to things they don’t enjoy like the hair brush or the nail clippers… those things get buried in the yard or chewed to pieces.  Rather, the dogs enjoy the shirt and will come up and paw for it when I get it out.

Within a few seconds of the shirt being on, the dogs chill out, get a little Zen and are just not highly reactive or anxious.  To me, a single $40 investment to help take the edge off during desensitization training has been well worth the money and the product is nicely made and has lasted several years and through a few wash cycles (mostly when I take it out to the park and the dogs fund a mud puddle to cool off in).

Severe thunder and fire works anxiety is a major problem for dogs during the 4th of July holiday.  More dogs are lost today than any other day of the year, by far.  Don’t let your dog become a statistic, and don’t let them continue to suffer from the common problem of noise phobia.  There are no miracle solutions, no singe pill or product or trick that will obviate the issue instantly and permanently.  It will take work on your part.  But there are some things you should try that are cheap, easy, and worth decreasing or eliminating the panic some dogs develop over the loud noises this time of year.

I recommend Melatonin and the use of a ThunderShirt based on my own experience of satisfactory efficacy of both products in treating my own dogs’ noise phobia. I don’t get paid by any Melatonin manufacturer or the makers of the ThunderShirt, I offer this advice only because I’ve seen these two products work on my own dogs.

The brain is the least understood organ in humans, dogs, and all animals. We don’t have a robust understanding of how it works and why many treatments for neurological disorders and conditions work.  A lot of it is basically guess and check and stumbling on drugs that alter brain chemistry, usually with rather negative side effects.  There is no cure for anxiety and depression, there are only treatments that work o.k. for some people, and some dogs.

It’s already too late to employ desensitization techniques for today’s fireworks, but you can use today as your first lesson.  I’d recommend tiring your dog out this afternoon before the big fireworks start, getting some high value treats like bacon, liverwurst, cheese or peanut butter and when the bombs go off, start treating your dog to associate the sound of the explosion with the treat, much like you “charge the clicker” when first starting clicker training.  There are 100 videos on youtube and any dog trainer worth their salt should be able to walk you through desensitizing your dog to the sound of the doorbell or other dogs barking or even thunder and lightning (although those are a bit harder because reproducing those sounds convincingly takes a hell of a sound system).

So if your dog panics during summer storms or fireworks celebrations, book your appointment now for a trainer to help you with the rather straightforward techniques.

But since it’s already the 4th and training takes TIME to work, try Melatonin now.

Melatonin is a natural hormone found in all living things and an antioxidant with very little risk of overdose.  I reviewed the literature and could not find a harmful effect of overdose.  Contact your Veterinarian for the right dose for your dog, but I’ve found 3mg effective for my 45 pound dogs.   Searching the internet seems to suggest does around 1mg per 10 pounds of up to 3x per day with a max of 6mg per dose even for dogs over 100 lbs.

Studies show that Melatonin is rapidly absorbed and reaches its maximum concentration in the blood between 20 and 30 minutes after dosing and has an elimination half life of 5 hours, so it can be given minutes to hours before a storm/fireworks show.

Melatonin is NOT a sedative, you won’t have a woozy or knocked out dog as a result.  Some Vets recommend Benedryl to act as a mild sedative but I’ve not tried this or found it necessary.

Other drugs which treat mood disorders and noise phobia require weeks of daily dosing to reach appropriate and efficacious levels in the body. Melatonin does not. You do not need to put your dog on it long term or pre-dose days before the storms or fireworks.  While it’d be optimal to dose in advance of the storm, I’ve noticed calming effects within a few minutes of a dose.  The cheap and readily available 3mg pills (the typical human dose for sleep and stress relief) are easy enough to pop down the dog’s throat or hide in a treat and it does come in liquid form which can be given under the tongue. Just be sure that there’s no sweetener like xylitol in the liquid form as that is toxic to dogs.

Most every grocery or vitamin store carries it for cheap, so pick up some when you run out for last minute barbecue items for your 4th of July celebration.

And no, I don’t own stock in a Melatonin company, and I’m hardly a pill pusher. I’ve just seen Melatonin work a miracle first hand.

Growing up, I lived less than a mile from a country club that hosted a fireworks display every year that is known for low-shot mortars that burst right overhead, and knock the wind out of you with every burst. The rich know how to party.

The best viewing for this yearly show for those of us who mow our own lawns is the elementary school parking lot half-way between home and the club. If the wind is right, the spent shells of the mortars will actually land in the lot, bringing a cloud of sulfur with them.

The tangible proximity and explosive percussion make for great entertainment, but whether we went to the show or not, the dogs never enjoyed the evening. What started as mild discomfort and hiding–that was easy to overlook or consider problematic–grew each year reaching full blown paranoia and panic.

Black Jack ate through this hollow core door to after busting out of his crate in the basement because of the loud local fireworks. Melatonin worked the next year to ease his anxiety greatly.

We didn’t appreciate it how bad the situation had gotten until we returned home to find that Black Jack, whom we had locked safely in the downstairs laundry room, had become so distraught at the noise that he chewed halfway through the hollow core door trying to escape.

Black Jack’s noise phobia was contagious and Bonnie Belle soon began leaving the room when people sneezed or hiding under the table when someone banged the pots pulling them out to cook dinner. These were adult dogs who hadn’t displayed the level of fear they had grown into during their early years.

We found Melatonin and never had an incident again. The first summer both dogs were aware of storms and fireworks, but quickly dropped their fear response, and during the next 4th of July we all watched the fireworks from our back yard without so much as a whimper.

With the current pack of dogs, I’ve used it selectively and prophylactically to cut possible noise phobia before it started, and it even helped me desensitize them to the new doorbell sound.

I recommend it highly, so ask your veterinarian about it. The all mighty google suggests that an appropriate dose for a small dog is 1/2 to 1 mg and 3 to 9 mg for larger dogs (25lbs+). Published studies showed no ill effects with amounts between 10-80 mg per kg of dog weight, MANY times the levels that appear effective for easing phobias.

Fast, effective, and safe. Do your dog a favor and give it a try. Save your laundry room doors from wanton predation!

 

* * *
Comments and disagreements are welcome, but be sure to read the Comment Policy. If this post made you think and you'd like to read more like it, consider a donation to my 4 Border Collies' Treat and Toy Fund. They'll be glad you did. You can subscribe to the feed or enter your e-mail in the field on the left to receive notice of new content. You can also like BorderWars on Facebook for more frequent musings and curiosities.
* * *

15

Life With Dogs Attacks Dog Breeders

Life With Dogs, whose business model is exploiting animal suffering by aggregating and plagiarizing dog stories that are emotionally manipulative, has come out harshly against dog breeders over a bogus viral dog story.

green_puppies_spain

The story itself originated in Spain and purports to show “rare” green puppies as if this is a newsworthy event.  It’s not, the green puppies are actually just stained from the placenta which is a mundane occurrence in dogs.  It also has nothing to do with the rather worrisome green that sometimes happens in human birth from meconium. In humans, if there is fetal distress the baby can relax its anal sphincter and poop meconium, which is green, which can stain the skin and cause infections if it is inhaled during birth.  In dogs the meconium is not green and it is not the cause of green puppies.

Green is (most often) completely normal in a canine delivery.

A portion of the canine placenta contains a green pigment. This green pigment is called uteroverdine [biliverdin]. When it appears at the vulva, it is a sign of placental separation. It is a signal that a puppy is being born. It is not a bad sign. It is not a sign of fetal distress. It is normal for the color green to appear in the amniotic fluid of the puppy.  If a placenta has been held back in the body of the bitch, the uteroverdine may even discolor a subsequent puppy slightly and the boy of the puppy may be slightly green. This is not abnormal. Under almost all circumstances in the dog, green is not a bad sign. The amniotic sac my be quite green in a whelping situation and it is completely normal. The green is simply a by-product of the uteroverdine in the placenta.

There is one exception. Because seeing green at the opening of the vulva is a signal that a puppy has separated from the placenta, it IS a bad sign if there is a green, pasty looking discharge from the vulva and your bitch is not in labor. If your pregnant bitch is just walking around normally and is not in labor, green discharge means that a puppy has separated from the placenta and there are problems. Call your vet immediately.

- Canine Reproduction and Whelping: A Dog Breeder’s Guide By Myra Savant-Harris

In the case of these Spanish hounds, which are born with very light colored coats, the green is easier to see than on dogs with darker coats.  There really is nothing newsworthy about this at all.

But facts never stood in the way of a slow news day and an overwrought dog story to fill space. The secondary headline of the “Two Green Dogs Born in Laguna” story claims “Experts in reproduction on the faculty of the Madrid Veterinary school analysed the case and assure that they have not seen anything like this in Spain.”  This is utter stupidity and a clear sign that animal husbandry standards are falling right along with standards in journalism.  But of course instead of consulting an actual reproduction specialist, they’re going to send off samples for “viral and bacteriological analysis.”

Since the color is from the natural oxidation of heme, there’s no viral or bacterial component and the appeal to grand mystery is just a tactic to cause confusion and hype a non-story into an eye-ball catcher.  And it’s worked, the story from a small online news outlet has gone hugely viral and has been picked up by dozens of “weird news” peddlers like Life With Dogs.

And the stupidity just gets thicker from there.  Check this declaration written by  Life With Dogs Admin Melanie at the end of the Life With Dogs mostly plagiarized version of the story:

We here at Life With Dogs do NOT encourage breeding while shelter dogs perish.  Please spay and neuter your pets, and find real employment of your own.

Great, yet another outlet that does little more than aggregate other people’s content and package it for sale using SEO tactics, combined with snotty anti-breeder rhetoric, just like DogTime.  Bleeding heart idiots who can’t seem to comprehend that nothing about dog breeding causes shelter dogs to die, in any way.  Dog breeders don’t fill shelters, they sell dogs to people based upon their mutual love of the animals.  In fact, the act of buying a dog instead of getting it for free from an oops litter from family or friends is a major factor that will prevent those dogs from ever going into a shelter.  So too is taking a dog to a vet, but obviously one more qualified and experienced in the actual life cycle of dogs than the one in the story who thinks a natural part of dog birth is a virus or bacteria.

Equating shelter deaths, which have fallen to new lows (fewer than 1.5% of all dogs per year) as they have for the last 40 years, is a vicious tactic by the animal rights movement who wants no pet animals, no animal breeding at all–equating owning a dog to slavery and eating meat to cannibalism and murder.  And such tactics work on stupid and ignorant people as exampled by the comments on the Life For Dogs story:

green_puppy_stupid_comments_1

green_puppy_stupid_comments_2

The comments from their Facebook link were no better. In fact the idiocy is so thick even GMOs were blamed for the tragedy of green puppies.  Jonathan Aaron makes the only intelligent comment on the thread save the few knowledgeable people trying to set the record straight on the unremarkable green puppies.

KJ Doyle Damnit. STOP OVERBREEDING.
June 12 at 4:08pm

Marissa Carmona Santamaria Omg poor puppies. Something is not right.

June 12 at 4:12pm

Cheri Montminy Dean Wow must be a GMO thing.
June 12 at 4:29pm

Letty Whittaker The mother looks malnourished, shame on those breeders!
June 12 at 4:28pm

Laura Leigh Tripp I don’t agree with any breeding either just making that clear . Way too many animals are abused neglected and passed away like trash its sickening
June 12 at 4:26pm

Ashley MacDonald That mama dog does not look good. Hope she got spayed and is saves from having more puppies.
June 12 at 4:34pm

Nida Magallanes The color is a fault..
June 12 at 4:37pm

Suzanne Sharma A mother dog that is so thin….dis disgusting and then also they have to sleep on newspaper?? I would be to ashamed to even post this picture on FB…. sad sad sad humans…..im wondering if your children are also in this condition…..why have a dog if you clearly dont know how to love and care for her…and its not a sif Spain has not got enough stray dogs…why the hell is this dog not spayed….. you make me sick….
June 12 at 4:41pm

Debbie Harsh I’d like to know where that Veterinarian got his license….
I’ve seen more commenters on this story knowing exactly where/how the green tint comes from than he did.
That poor dog looks to be in hideous conditions…poor thing has probably been bred too many times. I can’t even tell what kind of dog it’s supposed to be… sad and sick.
June 12 at 4:42pm

Blanka Kaiser Jonathan, WTH?? I hope someone convinces this woman to spay her dog and stop breeding. I wholeheartedly agree with the statement…these people should find real employment instead of living off the misery of these dogs! The mother dog in this picture looks miserable. ADOPT, DON’T SHOP!!
June 12 at 4:50pm

Connie Wasik Poor mommy must be very ill.
June 12 at 4:54pm

April ‘Skwertle’ Cranfield The mother looks in awful condition , she had been bred far too much I would certainly question her loving conditions poor little girl
June 12 at 4:57pm

Kathleen Teixeira Mama probably ate poison
June 12 at 5:05pm

Beth Bruski put him out in the sunlight. maybe the wrong genetic marker went off, and he has clorophyl (sp?)
June 12 at 5:14pm

Chelle Courtright My favorite quote of the article, “We here at Life With Dogs do NOT encourage breeding while shelter dogs perish. Please spay and neuter your pets, and find real employment of your own.”
June 12 at 5:23pm

Raven Elizabetta That momma dog is abused. Her face and condidtion of her body says everything.
June 12 at 5:40pm

Bridgette Milway They have abused that dog and obviously put green in its fur the mums nose is green the dog is sad and unhealthy obviously shit owners that have no kindness to animals
June 12 at 5:58pm

Cynthia Rosa Possibly copper toxicity or poisoning
June 12 at 6:12pm

Vicki Wolf I LOVE the Life With Dogs statement at the end: ” We here at Life With Dogs do NOT encourage breeding while shelter dogs perish. Please spay and neuter your pets, and find real employment of your own.” I want to send this to all irresponsible breeders!
June 12 at 6:12pm

Harriet Amacher I think somebody is messing around where they shouldn’t. Leave experiments in the lab. I don’t mean lab dogs either.
June 12 at 6:35pm

Preetha Devayya I hate the concept of’ breeding’ as all the innocent puppies born don’t get home’s with unconditional love which they deserve.The mother of these green pups looks malnourished & stressed out.Life is not all about money & acquisitions only.
June 12 at 9:43pm

Kenneth Ilaya Hefford put them in the sun and maybe they will undergo photosynthesis
June 12 at 10:04pm

Marcella Louise Curtis What made them Green, whatever it was must of made the little girl sick and died
June 13 at 1:13am

Jonathan Aaron “We here at Life With Dogs do NOT encourage breeding while shelter dogs perish. Please spay and neuter your pets, and find real employment of your own.” – “Real employment”? Like reposting ZERO original content on your blog? Wow, you worked so hard to get paid for some bogus social media-themed job. Jobs don’t just magically appear for the rest of us who don’t have rich, well-connected family.

I’ve only rescued dogs, but this little jab is insulting to everyone, not just breeders, who has struggled or is struggling to obtain employment doing hard work that gives back to society. How many people do you think gave up their dogs because their taxes pay for your parasitism? You’re ignorant if you think most people breed dogs as anything but a hobby. In an ideal world, there would /only/ be dog breeders, because people would raise and obtain dogs responsibly.

You took an innocuous story, and used it as a political soapbox to castigate responsible dog breeders, and everyone who doesn’t have your advantages at getting paid to do next to nothing. Don’t you feel any shame? Some of us get enough whiny politics on Facebook. I don’t need any more from you, unsubscribed.
June 12 at 4:19pm

Saskia Madding **Jonathan Aaron** – I think their point is that while SO MANY animals are being euthanized in ALL countries because of a complete overpopulation problem, there really *is* no “responsible breeding”.

***You cannot ethically breed animals as a source of income, in a world where so many are killed or die because they are unwanted.***

It happens a lot – people exploiting animals in order to make money. All you have to do is look at headlines about backyard breeders and small scale puppy millers.
June 12 at 4:23pm

It’s very disappointing that a non-story has been used so effectively to trump up even more unjustified anti-breeder hatred. This blog has hundreds of thousands of words devoted to breeder wrong-doing, but it’s based on facts and science and the sincere belief that by outing the actual corruptions of the culture we can improve it. But stories like these are not helpful. They propagate myths and engender hatred undeservedly, and all because hack outfits like “Life With Dogs” exist to earn ad revenue off any story of mild interest that can be inflated with puffery techniques into becoming a viral kerfuffle and increase ad revenue by getting sheeple to bawwwww and click and share.

It’s disgusting really.

* * *
Comments and disagreements are welcome, but be sure to read the Comment Policy. If this post made you think and you'd like to read more like it, consider a donation to my 4 Border Collies' Treat and Toy Fund. They'll be glad you did. You can subscribe to the feed or enter your e-mail in the field on the left to receive notice of new content. You can also like BorderWars on Facebook for more frequent musings and curiosities.
* * *

1

Shepherd’s Dog Remembers the Road

From Anecdotes of Dogs by Edward Jesse, Esq., 1858
The Colley Or Shepherd’s Dog: a sheep-dog remembers all the turnings of a road

 

Collies on Guard, George Horlor 1873

Collies on Guard, George Horlor 1873

The sense and recollection of the sheep-dog were shown in the following instance:—

When I occupied a small farm in Surrey, I was in the habit of joining with a friend in the purchase of two hundred Cheviot sheep. The first year we had them, the shepherd who drove them from the North was asked by us how he had got on. “Why, very badly,” said the man; “for I had a young dog, and he did not manage well in keeping the sheep from running up lanes and out-of-the-way places.” The next year we had the same number of sheep brought up, and by the same man. In answer to our question about his journey, he informed us that he had got on very well, for his dog had recollected all the turnings of the road which the sheep had passed the previous year, and had kept them straight the whole of the way.

 

 

* * *
Comments and disagreements are welcome, but be sure to read the Comment Policy. If this post made you think and you'd like to read more like it, consider a donation to my 4 Border Collies' Treat and Toy Fund. They'll be glad you did. You can subscribe to the feed or enter your e-mail in the field on the left to receive notice of new content. You can also like BorderWars on Facebook for more frequent musings and curiosities.
* * *

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Page 1 of 9712345...1015202530...Last »
  • Foreign Legion:
    collie de la frontera - eksteraj ligiloj - 邊境牧羊犬 - 边境牧羊犬 - ボーダーコリー - الحدود الكول -Бордер колли - בורדר קולי - ബോര്‍ഡര്‍ കോളി - Borderská kólia - border kolie